Philosophical Fashion 2: ANREALAGE "A COLOR UN COLOR"

2013.7.12 (Fri.) - 2013.11.24 (Sun.)

"Philosophical Fashion"—a series inquiring into the meaning of clothing today, when trends change with dizzying speed, driven by the phenomenal rise of "fast fashion." Featured in this series are creators who consistently propose new fashions on the basis of an enduring concept. Our second exhibit of this series looks at "ANREALAGE," a fashion brand that has captured attention with conceptual designs reflecting a truly unique vision of the body and clothing, distinguished by scrupulous attention to detail in the making.
ANREALAGE takes "real," "unreal" and "age" as its concept. MORINAGA Kunihiko, the brand’s designer, analyzes the "real" of everyday life we are ordinarily unaware of. Abstracting the "unreal" from that reality, he applies unreal fantasies to his conception of clothing.
Morinaga’s methods are astonishing and time-consuming—a suit sewn with 5,000 buttons or a patchwork jacket made of several hundred fabric pieces. His approach is distinguished by conceptual "form"—clothing fitted to spheres, triangular pyramids, squares, and human bodies of odd proportions. He works, then, in a spirit of experimentation using cutting-edge technologies—exceedingly sensitive "laser cut" fabric cutting, for instance, and threads and dyes that change color in response to sunlight.
Morinaga pursues the essence of fashion within close observation of his age. Although his designs are always met with surprise, his aim is not to produce Morinaga "creations." Rather, by reducing "creations" to wearable "products" of the ANREALAGE brand, he draws consumers into involvement and seeks to penetrate society and the times.
Morinaga’s theme this time—A COLOR UN COLOR. His inquiry into color, as a fashion designer, he will unfold in the space of a transparent gallery.

HIRABAYASHI Megumi, Curator

Shimabuku: Noto

2013.4.27 (Sat.) - 2014.3.2 (Sun.)

Shimabuku travels the world, creating artworks that examine how people live and communicate. For this long-term project lasting one year, Shimabuku is traveling to Noto to satisfy his curiosity about its unusual customs and products. Then, based on what he discovers there from his unique artistic perspective, he is creating new artworks. The project is the 7th undertaking of the “Kanazawa Youth Dream Challenge Art Programme,” which offers young people from Kanazawa and other regions opportunities to work together with artists. As such, it has already (since April) seen some 28 “volunteer members” visit Noto with Shimabuku and return to recreate their discoveries there, in a museum gallery. From September 28, the artist is exhibiting the new works he has created with the members. Workshops and other events are also being held with Noto and this museum as a stage. Visitors to the exhibition will be freshly moved by Shimabuku’s unique perspective on Noto, so that they look anew at things all around them.

Visceral Sensation — Voices So Far, So Near

2013.4.27 (Sat.) - 2013.9.1 (Sun.)

Our organs contain life memory and life rhythms from the far distant past, according to anatomist MIKI Shigeo (1925-1987). Miki’s observations of human behavior, senses, and emotions have profoundly influenced diverse fields. This exhibition will ponder Miki’s views and take “visceral sensation”—the most primeval and fundamental of the human senses—as an aid to appreciating contemporary artworks that converse with the voices of life within us and induce new perceptual awakenings.
Featured will be 13 artists and artist collaboratives from Japan and abroad: Louise BOURGEOIS, CHO Shinta, Nathalie DJURBERG & Hans BERG, KATO Izumi, KUSAMA Yayoi, Ana MENDIETA, NAKAGAWA Yukio, Saskia OLDE WOLBERS, OLTA, Pipilotti RIST, SHIGA Lieko, Bill VIOLA, and WATANABE Kikuma. All, as artists, consciously or unconsciously explore the sensations, perceptions, and emotions emanating from our primordial physical embodiment, or respond to the life rhythms resonating silently in our organs, the axis of our physical being. Working in painting, sculpture, photography, video, picture books, architecture, installation, and performance, they manifest these inner voices in their artworks.
Today, when our fears of environmental and socio-economic collapse are becoming real—as demonstrated by the anxiety and discomfort we have known, concerning radiation, since the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake and nuclear power plant disaster—what do we feel in our bodies; what are our bodies saying? This exhibition will be a place where visitors, prompted by the sensations they experience in their encounter with each artwork, will tune into, feel, and ponder the “voices so far, so near” that speak within and around them as people of an uncertain age.

YOSHIOKA Emiko, Curator
21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art, Kanazawa

Borderline Collection Exhibition I

2013.4.13 (Sat.) - 2013.7.15 (Mon.)

The sense of strangeness, insecurity, and fear we feel when encountering the unknown. Such feelings come to us as a sign we are about to cross a border. The people with whom we share a language, physical characteristics, rules, and memories we see as “inside” our familiar world, and all others we view as “outside.” Thus, we unconsciously make a distinction and construct a border separating “inside” from “outside.” Borders at times repel the outside, as a threat to the security of the inside, and produce conflict. Yet, a border can also be a fluid territory, continually renewed as inside and outside negotiate and discover new rules. Borders can also tell us how we, ourselves, see the world and people outside. Borders, this is to say, can potentially help us broaden our inside world. Taking such perspectives, our Collection Exhibition this time will reconsider the character of borders, not as a cause of “division” but rather as a means of “connection” and broadening our world. Collection Exhibition I will look at the borders of the body, and Collection Exhibition II, at social and systematic borders.
Life forms, human beings included, have an inside enveloped a membrane. By taking materials from outside into their inside, life forms obtain energy and sustain their life. When it comes to our bodies with their complex organs, one part may actually be an outside that is inside, while another part, an inside that is outside. This kind of a structure, where inside and outside develop by reversing themselves, shows us something of the character of a border. In Collection Exhibition I, taking the most familiar example—our bodies—we will use borders as a means to explore human existence and our relationship with the world around us.

YONEDA Seiko, Curator, 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art, Kanazawa

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