Collection Asian Landscapes / Awazu Kiyoshi: Makurihirogeru 5

2018.11.3 (Sat.) - 2019.3.3 (Sun.)

The many art styles coming out of Asia, intimately related to their particular vernacular history and culture, intently explore the interval between tradition and rapid globalization, working trial and error. This exhibition presents works, trained by the waves of post-industrialization and technological change, that ask the universal question, “Where is humanity headed?” These works, which illuminate our changing society from Artists based their activities in Asian, vernacular culture, are presented under the theme, “Asian Landscapes.”
Then, this time’s small special exhibition, “Makurihirogeru”—the fifth (and final) investigative-research exhibition devoted to Awazu Kiyoshi, displays pasteup originals of Awazu print works. Through them, it examines Awazu’s thinking as a creator who continually asked “What is design”? and never relinquished his focus on “reproduction.”

Do Ho Suh Home within Home - 1/11th Scale - Prototype 2009
© Do Ho Suh
Courtesy of the Artist, and Lehmann Maupin Gallery, New York and Hong Kong
Photo: Taegsu Jeon

Aperto 09 Nishimura Yu

2018.10.6 (Sat.) - 2019.3.24 (Sun.)

In the same painting, Nishimura Yu (1982-) complexly overlays different scenes or actions catching his eye—fragments of “fulfilling hours enjoyed in daily life”—and composes them in a landscape. The resulting blurry picture evokes a place seemingly far removed from reality and pulls the viewer into the depicted scene.

scenery passing (reflected in the window) 2017
© Yu Nishimura
Courtesy of KAYOKOYUKI

Culture City of East Asia 2018 Kanazawa

Altering Home

2018.9.15 (Sat.) - 2018.11.4 (Sun.)

Works of “house” theme by Japanese, Chinese and Korean contemporary artists
In our world today, the “house” is being structured into systems of social meaning. The “house” as a physical entity is easy to generalize, but the “house” as an overall fusion of emotional values, customs, and cultural elements eludes understanding unless viewed from many angles. Above all, today, when mobility has become the norm due to globalization, houses can be anywhere or multiple or even nowhere. Taking this as a premise, Japanese, Chinese, and Korean contemporary artists searched for unused everyday living spaces in Kanazawa and created artworks on the theme of “house.”


Han Seok Hyun Super-Natural 2011/2016
Courtesy of the artist

Culture City of East Asia 2018 Kanazawa

Qiu Zhijie Images of the World

2018.9.8 (Sat.) - 2019.3.3 (Sun.)

Our existence, reflected in maps
Unlike many contemporary artists in China who seek to criticize the system or be avant-garde, Qiu Zhijie is defined by his dynamic perspective of inquiry into basic values universal to human existence. This exhibition examines Qiu’s use of “mapmaking”—a means of seeing the world comprehensively and representing relationships between things—as a medium for understanding “who we are.” This museum’s first solo exhibit by a Chinese artist since its opening.

QUI Zhijie Propagator in the Darkness 2008
© QUI Zhijie

lab.3

DeathLAB: Democratizing Death

2018.7.7 (Sat.) - 2019.1.14 (Mon.)

DeathLAB, founded by Karla Rothstein at Columbia University in 2013, is an interdisciplinary initiative exploring the space and social consequence of urban disposition and memorialization. Housed at the Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation, DeathLAB’s cross-cutting research engages diverse academic fields, including architecture, environmental engineering, religious studies and sociology. We will introduce the lab’s ongoing work, which intertwines sacred space and civic life.

Constellation Park 2014
©LATENT Productions and Columbia GSAPP DeathLAB

Starting Points: Japanese Art of the ‘80s

2018.7.7 (Sat.) - 2018.10.21 (Sun.)

Eighties Japanese art—what was it?
Several important trends arose in the Eighties that bear directly on art in Japan today. They include installation art, reliance on viewer participation, new awareness of art’s relationship with society, and the debut of alternative spaces and media art. Artists moreover objectively viewed “art” as an institution, discovered an interest in “the everyday,” and took an attitude of valuing flexibility. The subculture of this decade also strongly impacted art in the Nineties and thereafter. This exhibition looks deeply into Eighties art, seeking the origins of today’s art scene not in subculture but in authentic “art.”

MORIMURA Yasumasa Portrait (Van Gogh) 1985
©MORIMURA Yasumasa

Aperto 08 Nanakarage Ayano

2018.4.28 (Sat.) - 2018.9.24 (Mon.)

Taking as her theme the vastness of nature seen in mountains and forests, and the ephemerality of rainbows and mist, NANAKARAGE Ayano (1987-) meditates on such natural phenomena and, blending in her own interpretations and analogies, evokes its qualities in wood sculptures. Her “rainbows edge” series, featured in this exhibition, conjoins her own fabric-draped figure with the shapes of dried banana stems and other dried and withered plants. Her fusion of withered and gnarled plants with smooth drapery (a human figure) conveys a disquieting impression of old age melded with youth or some bizarre creature hidden under the fabric. At the same time, the works evoke the serenity of Buddhist or Shinto deity sculptures as well as the dread of having seen something forbidden. Vibrant living organisms age with time and grow dry and gnarled, and slowly change form. In such transformation, Nanakarage discovers a transcendent beauty. Her eye, as such, has the power to refresh our values as people of contemporary society conditioned to look away from deterioration and decay.

rainbows edgeI 2015
©NANAKARAGE Ayano

Ay Tjoe Christine : Spirituality and Allegory

2018.4.28 (Sat.) - 2018.8.19 (Sun.)

Ay Tjoe Christine (b. 1973) was born in Bandung, West Java, Indonesia, and is a renowned contemporary artist active in Indonesia today. She studies intaglio printing methods such as drypoint and then turned to working with textiles. Her artistic activities got their real start around 2000. Ay Tjoe Christine’s works express themes based on Christian mythologies and spiritual concepts, supported by her deep insight into human incompletion and Janus-faced nature. The color fragments that scatter and float across her pictures reveal, on one hand, the actions of her own wavering emotions, while the abstract images that set up fascinating harmonies with the canvas’ negative space reveal her sincere stance as she investigates the relationship between humans and all things. This is Ay Tjoe Crhistine’s first solo exhibition at a Japanese museum, presenting about 50 works that trace her two decades of multifaceted creativity, from early period drawings and drypoint, to a group of oil paintings that explore the potential for expression from the representational to the abstract, soft sculptures and large-scale installations, and large format paintings created for this exhibition.

We Are Getting Highly Overrated Because You've Never Known Us 01 (detail) 2015
170x300cm Oil on canvas Private Collection
©Ay Tjoe Christine, courtesy of Ota Fine Arts

Runa ISLAM Scale (1/16 inch= 1 foot)

2018.4.28 (Sat.) - 2018.6.24 (Sun.)

From the 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art, Kanazawa collection, we are pleased to present Runa Islam’s Scale (1/16 inch = 1 foot) in its first showing.
Runa Islam continually explores the concepts behind cinematic ideas, subjects, and forms, as well as film’s power to affect our perception and reception of ideas and images. In her early films and installations, she referenced experimental and avant-garde films, and used their film lexicon to develop her own methodology. Analyzing and grasping the images, styles, and methods of modern cinema, she disrupts the relationships between reality and fiction, between visual and architectural space and between “seeing” and “being seen,” and throws the viewer’s interpretation of the narrative into confusion. By means of this process, she constructs a cinematic experience from her own perspective on the world.
This work, a two-screen video installation, features a multilevel car park in Gateshead in northeast England that appears in a scene from the film Get Carter (1971, UK). Filmed on a stage set that imagines an unbuilt restaurant originally planned for the building’s top floor, it depicts interactions between two young waiters and two elderly male customers. At a certain moment, the actors exchange roles, and images of the actual location and the stage set, as well as the building and building model, become shuffled to up-tempo music. While the work uses the lexicon of suspense films—the looks and gestures of the actors, the camerawork, the switching between scenes, the lighting, the music, and so on—the shifting between reality and illusion is depicted with a lyrical touch. Moreover, because the screens are positioned one in front of the other, the audience becomes lost in the entangled world depicted in the work without being able to fully grasp it.

Collection Exhibition Adventure in “Seeing”

2018.1.27 (Sat.) - 2018.6.24 (Sun.)

Seeing is something most of us take for granted. Yet, to consciously see is surprisingly difficult, and as a result, we tend to miss much of what there is to see.
An art museum is a place for “seeing,” “admiring,” and “thinking about” artworks. To the visitors to this exhibition, whether they normally enjoy viewing artworks or find it difficult, we would like to say, “First of all, begin by seeing well.” The exhibition “Adventures in ‘Seeing’” starts there.
Open yourself to the artwork a little more than usual. Stand and view it 10 seconds longer than usual. After viewing it thoroughly, relax and view it a little more. Doing so, you will begin to see details you had not noticed, and your imagination will have time to come into play. Discoveries, surprises, and new feelings will come to you in an experience really no different from an adventure story.
Please look actively at the artworks and unfold your very own adventure story.
(YAMASHITA Juri, exhibition curator)

Janet Cardiff & George Bures Miller

2017.11.25 (Sat.) - 2018.3.11 (Sun.)

Janet Cardiff and George Bures Miller’s works display a command of sophisticated sound and video technology, and striking sculptural creations. The viewer undergoes a complex perceptual experience of “hearing and seeing” and enters their imaginative world in a spell of enchantment. When experiencing a Cardiff and Bures Miller work, unseen things become visible, soundless things are heard, and we suddenly step beyond reality into their stories with our senses and values in disarray.
Cardiff and Bures Miller’s exhibition at this time features new works and eight installations being shown in Japan for the first time. Installed in the spatially autonomous galleries of this museum, the pieces will transport the audience to imaginary interconnected worlds. A precious opportunity to experience the work of a groundbreaking international artist team.

Local Textile 1

TO & FRO Thinner, Lighter

2017.11.18 (Sat.) - 2018.6.24 (Sun.)

Part 1 the “Local Textile” series features TO & FRO, a travel gear brand of the Kaji Group based in Kanazawa and Kahoku. The brand’s name evokes an image of traveling lightly and comfortably “to and fro.” The Kaji Group, possessing advanced technology for weaving extremely thin thread, is producing fabric of unusually light nylon. The nylon fabric is currently used in products by outdoor brands around the world. TO & FRO is the Kaji Group’s own brand of travel organizers and other products created using this fabric. The travel organizers are displayed in this exhibition along with a wide range of fabric samples. Ishikawa prefecture, as a textile producer, has also developed a loom manufacturing industry. Although textile production tends to rely on division of labor, the Kaji Group possesses its own plant for customizing looms. Innovative production at the plant has enabled thread tensioning conducive of weaving with the thinnest, most easily breakable threads. High functionality is a powerful competitive edge over inexpensive mass-produced imported products and an important strategy for the future of Japan’s textile industry.

TARO IZUMI A Child Suddenly

2017.10.7 (Sat.) - 2018.3.25 (Sun.)

Taro Izumi (1976 – ) is an artist mainly known for his installations that cross video, performance, drawing, painting, sculpture and other media, exhibiting his work frequently at home and abroad. Izumi’s work characteristically involves everyday matters and objects, and sometimes large numbers of people; by capturing actions that appear at first sight to have no real significance, Izumi highlights absurd experiences that lurk in everyday life. Time and space, real and virtual image, inside and outside, free and unfree – Izumi’s practice plays with and blurs such conventional divisions which we unthinkingly impose on the world, questioning them from startling angles.
In this exhibition, Izumi is presenting four new artworks and one book project. Staged in Theater 21 and the Long-Term Project Room is B: But the lens had clearly captured the passing tiger., a work consisting of feature films – the artist’s first such endeavor – along with film posters and a popcorn stand. On the outside of the Long-Term Project Room, there is The Transparent Drool of Fantasy, a work whose concept is “windows fitted with night.” Dawn of the Compact Structures, which will be released halfway through the exhibition period, is a series of videos that superimposes multiple layers of time, resulting in a novel structure for a film. On top of these, works will be completed and added to the exhibition over Izumi’s long-term stay at Kanazawa, including Y: Raise your knee, now lower it. P: I put the stones away so they won’t trip., which sets its sights on the visitors to the 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art, Kanazawa. Alongside these video works and installations, Izumi will also collaborate with a critic – a specialist at handling words – to produce A Dark Gray Book (provisional title). This work will explore, in book form, new means of communication that might be able to substitute and improve on words.
Izumi has long probed the ever-unsolvable, ever-expanding question concerning the knotted relationship that films and images share with the human body and consciousness. This exhibition promises to be an extremely ambitious undertaking that presents a wholly new approach to this question, while remaining in touch with his practice to date.


Collection Exhibition 2 Undying Life

2017.7.22 (Sat.) - 2018.1.8 (Mon.)

Today, with the development scientific technologies such as artificial intelligence and biotechnology, long-standing social values are being vigorously shaken. This exhibition displays works concerned with the “migration” of life forms, ranging in spectrum from the transmigration of souls to the artificial creation of new species. We explore the meaning of creating new life forms and possibilities of living in “artificial nature.”

TSUBAKI Noboru Aesthetic Pollution
1990
© TSUBAKI Nabber
Installation view, Collection Exhibition “Invisible Reality” (2010-11)
Wall drawings: KIMURA Yuki, TATEGAMI Kotaro