Architecture since 3.11

2014.11.1 (Sat.) - 2015.5.10 (Sun.)

As a special exhibition marking its 10th anniversary, 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art, Kanazawa will hold an exhibition, “Architecture since 3.11,” exploring new architectural trends in Japan since the 3.11 disaster. The 2011 Tohoku earthquake and tsunami forced architects to fundamentally rethink their understanding of architecture and society’s systems. What role will be demanded of architects hereafter, and what kind of future should they envision? Including such perspectives as energy and environment within its scope, the exhibition will look at architecture since 2011 through the endeavors of 25 architectural offices and ponder the architect’s role.

Japan Architects 1945-2010

2014.11.1 (Sat.) - 2015.3.15 (Sun.)

As a special exhibition marking its 10th anniversary, 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art, Kanazawa is collaborating with the Centre Pompidou (Paris) in holding exhibition of post-war Japanese architecture, “Japan Architects 1945-2010” taking the Centre Pompidou’s collection of works and materials as a core.

Mr. Migayrou has divided the 65-year period from 1945 to 2010 into six sections and color-coded each section’s concept. His compelling vantage point on post-war Japanese architecture will be another exhibition highlight.

Architects played a major role in Japan’s national project of reconstructing from the ruins of war. Adhering to the principles of modernism or, in some cases, pursing an essentially Japanese style, they designed and constructed public facilities and buildings of all kinds. As they did so, the architects gradually expanded their focus from architecture to urban design, and in the 1960s, the architectural movement “Metabolism” was born, impelled by new economic and technological development. This movement reached its apogee at the 1970 Osaka Exposition and thereafter diversified, further evolved, and formed a new vision. A younger generation of architects inherited its aims, but already a minimalist style of architecture—what might be called “architecture of elimination”—was sweeping the nation. Then, in the late 1990s, after the collapse of Japan’s bubble economy and the Kobe Earthquake, works appeared that re-examined architecture from the perspectives of “narrative” and “program,” and many Japanese architects rose to international acclaim.
This exhibition offers a precious opportunity to follow the tracks of the Japanese architects who, swinging between Western modernism and Japanese identity, created their own style and vision and garnered international attention. The great number of works and materials—over 240 original drawings and models by some 80 architects who spear-headed the development of post-war Japanese architecture—are invaluable tools for understanding these architects’ conceptual and design processes. All together, they form an architecture exhibition of a scale never before seen in Japan. It is an exhibition of importance—not only for the light it casts on architectural history but also for the deep insight it offers into Japan’s rapidly changing post-war society.

APERTO 1

KIM Mitsuo White light White heat

2014.9.13 (Sat.) - 2014.11.24 (Mon.)

“Aperto,” a new series, takes a solo exhibition format to highlight up-and-coming young artists and examine new trends in the making. “KIM Mitsuo: White light White heat” is the inaugural exhibition in this series.
Kim Mitsuo employs silk-screen techniques to explore the relationship between serial images and the image they produce as a total effect. Spreading a thin layer of paraffin wax on a board, he transfers an ink image to the wax using silk screen. He then exposes the surface to heat and melts the wax, halting the process to let it harden just before the image disappears entirely. The ink portions that melt along with the wax return to an unfigured state and remain as spaces of emptiness. Although a two-dimensional work, its surface is disturbed by projections of the wax and shows the traces of Kim’s own physical actions.
The indistinct, broken lines of a fence or chair form an ambiguous boundary, causing us to sense another world of light beyond. While giving play to the qualities of his materials and techniques, Kim implies that opposing phenomena exist in the same world and gives visual embodiment to a situation in which the essential spirit of what we expect to see is missing.
Yumiko Tatematsu (Curator, 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art, Kanazawa)

SUZUKI Yasuhiro’s Mitate Laboratory

2014.9.13 (Sat.) - 2014.11.24 (Mon.)

"This reminds me something else," we often wonder to ourselves. The technique of representing one object with another is called mitate. Yasuhiro Suzuki likens a boat’s wake to a zipper or the ball of a kendama cup-and-ball to an apple and, in this way, rediscovers familiar objects and phenomena from his own perspective. The artworks he creates using this technique help open up our perceptions of the world. This autumn, 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art, Kanazawa is holding a "project exhibit" of mitate theme. The exhibit will occasion a fresh look at the art museum and around Kanazawa.

Taste of Curiosity ― Museum of Curiosity food creation + The University Museum, The University of Tokyo

2014.4.26 (Sat.) - 2015.3.31 (Tue.)

21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art, Kanazawa will mark its 10th anniversary on October 9 this year. On this occasion, we are holding "Taste of Curiosity – Museum of Curiosity"—a program to create a "banquet" site for celebrating our 10 years with everyone. The program is being led by food creation / SUWA Ayako—a project to propose new values for the enjoyment of food—and The University Museum, The University of Tokyo, which will create a "The Chambers of Curiosities." The program will be an unprecedented art museum event, taking "taste" as a theme in harkening back to the original impulse behind the museum concept—curiosity.
Already, more than 50 "Foodstuffs of Curiosity" have been gathered, and over 400 people will take part in "Experiences of Taste." The program will develop in stages toward an exciting climax as a "banquet."

Ayako Suwa, Scent of Woman 2014 Photo: Hiroshi Iwasaki +cow skull (The University Museum, The University of Tokyo)