Jeppe Hein 360°

2011.4.29 (Fri.) - 2011.8.31 (Wed.)

“360°” is the young Danish artist Jeppe Hein’s first solo exhibition at a Japanese art museum. Staged in seven galleries and in corridors, the exhibition offers ten works, including humorous installation works exploring the viewer’s relationship with art. The title, “360°,” while reflecting the Museum’s round design open in all directions, expresses Hein’s wish to draw viewers into involvement, and his desire to awaken new perceptions of spaces by means of artworks in motion using water,
mirrors and light. “360°” will be an interactive exhibition offering playful encounters with spaces.

Silent Echoes: Collection Exhibition I

2011.4.29 (Fri.) - 2011.7.18 (Mon.)

How did it come? For a minute the opening balanced from one side to the other. Like a walk or march.
Like God strutting in the night. The outside of her was suddenly froze and only that first part of the
music was hot inside her heart. She could not even hear what sounded after, but she sat there waiting
and froze, with her fists tight. After a while the music came again, harder and loud. It didn’t have anything to do with God. This was her, Mick Kelly, walking in the daytime and by herself at night. In the hot sun and in the dark with all the plans and feelings. This music was her – the real plain her.

[Carson McCullers, The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter, Mariner Books, p. 118.]

“Silent Echo: Collection Exhibition I” makes a special presentation of L’écho by TSE Su-Mei, an artist
born in Luxembourg whose work resonates deeply with the world of music and human life conveyed by
the above quote from Carson McCullers’s novel, The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter. This exhibition reveals
possibilities of the museum collection that have seldom been discussed before.
Through selected works from the museum collection, we highlight an artistic world created through a
complete fusion of self, technique, and the world, which is exemplified by L’écho, an artwork based on a
process of connecting and blending a wide variety of phenomena related to the body, sound, technique, and the self.

Peter McDonald: Visitor

2011.4.16 (Sat.) - 2012.3.20 (Tue.)

With this edition, the Kanazawa Youth Dream Challenge Art Programme (*1) breaks new ground by setting its sights on an overseas artist. The Program invites the young, internationally recognized, UK-based artist Peter McDonald to develop an art project for the first time in Japan, marking the first international edition of the Program. Through the “act of painting,” McDonald, at the core of the project, rubs shoulders with others, lightly traversing the boundary between genres, genders, countries and the everyday and the extraordinary. As young people (*2) participate in the work, they experience the diversity of and possibilities for communication. Beginning with a painting exhibition and the production of a wall installation at the museum, various extemporaneous programs will be held using the exhibition space as a stage. As McDonald interacts with the city and the people of Kanazawa, his painted world will permeate the city, establishing pliable onnections between one person and another, and between people and places through the fundamental language of expression we know as painting.

*1.
Launched in 2007 adopting the methodology of the Zon Moderna outreach program at the Moderna Museet in Stockholm, Sweden, the 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art, Kanazawa's unique program takes the form of a long-term project-based exhibition involving an artist-in-residence, work-in-progress and workshops. Targeted mainly at young people 18-39 years of age, participants in the Programme work together to rediscover and to grow their view of themselves and of the world. Based on the results of the past four stagings of the Programme, 2011 marks its further development as a case-study compilation of the Museum's key concept of “museum as mediator”.

*2.
Participants
Wall painting members (active April 20–June 5): 9
Project members (active June 5–end of March, 2012): 12

MADE-IN-JAPAN Table Clocks: Focusing on the 1960’s

2011.2.5 (Sat.) - 2011.5.29 (Sun.)

During Japan’s post-war economic recovery in the 1950s and 1960s, a style of design alien to traditional lifestyle sensibilities permeated the Japanese way of life under America’s influence. Among the items of that time, made-in-Japan clocks of brilliant plastic colors still strike a fresh impression. In this exhibition, we present some 400 table clocks of the Showa period.