Collection Exhibition 1

Collection 1 PLAY / AWAZU Kiyoshi, Makurihirogeru (EXPOSE) 4Makurihirogeru 4

2017.4.29 (Sat.) -
2017.7.23 (Sun.)

Information

Period :
2017.4.29 (Sat.) - 2017.7.23 (Sun.)
10:00 - 18:00 (until 20:00 on Fridays and Saturdays)
Venue :
Galleries / 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art, Kanazawa
Galleries 7-14
Closed:
Mondays (Open on May 1, Jul 17) and Jul 18 (Tue.)
Admission:
Adult: ¥360 (¥280)
University: ¥280 (¥220)
Elem/ JH/ HS: Free
65 and over: ¥280
*( ) indicate group rates (20 or more).
For More Information:
21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art, Kanazawa
Phone: +81-76-220-2800
Facsimile: +81-76-220-2802
E-Mail: info@kanazawa21.jp

About the Exhibition

The meaning of PLAY is not limited to ‘activity engaged in for enjoyment and recreation.’ It is also a word that expresses active and aggressive acts in our daily life including ‘acting, performing, having a game, behaving and conducting oneself.’ Viewed in that light, our daily life is a succession of PLAY, which might be said to construct one’s personal life and in a broader sense, the culture of human beings.
In this exhibition, works by 12 collection artists are introduced focusing on the keyword of PLAY with manifold meanings. They show diverse expansion from works which encourage new discoveries and ideas through viewers’ experiences, to works in which the accumulation of artists’ daily acts and thinking as well as performance and competition are incorporated. We would like to think about how PLAY that is an essential function of humankind appears in the works and what kind of relationship viewers and artworks can develop through the exhibition. We hope that this exhibition itself will inspire viewers to get involved in various PLAYs.
Featured also is a small special exhibit of AWAZU Kiyoshi photographic works.

Film Work Schedule

The Music of Regret, 2005-2006
44min. 14sec.
©Laurie SIMMONS
Courtesy of the artist and Salon 94, New York.

Laurie SIMMONS / The Music of Regret

Admission: Free
Open: 10 minutes before
Duration: 45minutes *Please do not enter during the screening.

May

Mon
Tue
Wed
Thu
Fri
Sat
Sun
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16 11:00-
17
18
19 19:00-
20
21 15:00-
22
23 11:00-
24
25
26 19:00-
27
28 15:00-
29
30 11:00-
31


June
Mon
Tue
Wed
Thu
Fri
Sat
Sun
1
2 19:00-
3
4 15:00-
5
6 11:00-
7
8
9 19:00-
10
11 15:00-
12
13 11:00-
14
15
16
17
18 15:00-
19
20 11:00-
21
22
23 19:00-
24
25 15:00-
26
27 11:00-
28
29
30 19:00-
31


July
Mon
Tue
Wed
Thu
Fri
Sat
Sun
1
2 15:00-
3
4 11:00-
5
6
7 19:00-
8
9 15:00-
10
11 11:00-
12
13
14 19:00-
15
16 15:00-
17
18
19
20
21 19:00-
22
23 15:00-
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31

Profile

Michael BRENNAND-WOOD, Destroy the Heart, 1999
inlaid fabric, marble dust, sand, wood, metal
each panel: φ100.5×D10.0cm
collection: 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art, Kanazawa
© Michael BRENNAND-WOOD
photo: KIOKU Keizo

Michael BRENNAND-WOOD

Born in Bury, UK in 1952. Lives and works in Wrestlingworth
Brennand-Wood studied textiles at university and graduate school. He created works using not only textiles but also other materials such as lattices of wood intricately intertwined with cloth and threads. While he pursues three-dimensional expression with textiles, he has a strong interest in traditional techniques such as lace and embroidery, and produces artworks influenced by the decorative cultures of Asia and Africa. Crossing over different cultures and materials, he quests for a rich, multi-layered world of expression.

KATO Izumi, Untitled, 2012
oil on canvas
H224×W162cm
collection: 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art, Kanazawa
© KATO Izumi
photo: SAIKI Taku

KATO Izumi

Born in Shimane, Japan in 1960. Lives and works in Tokyo
Since the 2000’s, Kato has garnered attention as an innovative artist through solo and group exhibitions held in Japan and abroad. Kato depicts human figures with large heads, small limbs, and emphatically rounded bellies. The figures are striking for the distant expression in their perfectly round eyes. Kato does not use a brush, preferring to paint directly with a finger on a rough texture canvas. The ‘humans’ he creates in this manner are loosely connected with background lines evoking mountains or water. They impart to us the vibrations of life and the rhythms of creatures’ sympathetic vibrations with nature, often with plants growing from a part of their body. From the mid-2000s, he has also created wood sculptures, and in recent years he is turning to unusual media such as soft vinyl to produce three-dimensional works that seem strangely alive.

KUSAMA Yayoi, Self-Obliteration, 1963-1974
mixed media (wood, cloth, basket, plastic, ceramic, oil, etc.)
each H50.0×W42.0×D81.0cm (2 chairs)
H75.0×W105.0×D120.0cm (table)
collection: 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art, Kanazawa
© Yayoi Kusama
courtesy: MOMA Contemporary

KUSAMA Yayoi

Born in Matsumoto, Nagano, Japan in 1929. Lives and works in Tokyo.
Kusama Yayoi, whose career stretches back more than 50 years, has had a major impact on the art world both in Japan and overseas. She began exhibiting work in Japan in the early 1950s before moving to the U.S. in 1957. She based herself in New York, creating installations and staging various performances. In the 1970’s she returned to Japan to live, where she continues to live and work. Starting out from paintings that depicted her own experiences from childhood, she has gone on to produce large two-dimensional, three-dimensional, and installation pieces, her trademark repeating and multiplying polka dots and nets representing her unique outlook on the world.

KOIE Makiko, From the series “P,” P-17, 2001
type-C print
H240×W360cm
collection: 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art, Kanazawa
© KOIE Makiko

KOIE Makiko

Born in Kyoto, Japan in 1969. Lives and works in Nara.
Since the 1990s, Koie Makiko has consistently produced photographic studies of nature and crowds at racecourses, baseball stadiums, and the like on large panels. In these works, rather than capturing her subjects objectively, Koie conjures up a world resembling an imagined scene by blurring or overlapping the images and using subtle color tones. The panels, in which images are often superimposed to form several layers, have an air of tranquillity as if they were part of a distant memory.

Rosemary LAING, flight research #5, 1999
color print
H122×W266cm
collection: 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art, Kanazawa
© Rosemary LAING

Rosemary LAING

Born in Brisbane, Australia in 1959. Lives and works in Sydney.
After studying painting, in the 1980s Rosemary Laing began unveiling conceptual photographic works and performances. Her works typically consist of large, panoramic photographs in which highly energetic performances are photographed in various settings including the vast Australian wilderness and products of mechanical civilization, such as airports and aircraft interiors. Her own grandiose plans are often realized with the help of experts in various fields, such as astrophysicists, landscape photographers, stuntpersons, and airline personnel.

MORIMURA Yasumasa, Barco negro na mesa+Five Water Towers
“Barco negro at night”, 1984-2007
mixed media
dimensions variable
collection: 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art, Kanazawa
© MORIMURA Yasumasa
photo: NAKAMICHI Atsushi / Nacása & Partners

MORIMURA Yasumasa

Born in Osaka, Japan in 1951. Lives and works there.
After graduating from Kyoto City University of Arts, Morimura Yasumasa worked as an assistant to photographer Ernest SATO at the university, which had a great impact on him. In 1985, he photographed himself disguised in a recreation of Vincent VAN GOGH’s famous self-portrait. Since producing these works, Morimura has continued to use the technique of ‘becoming another’ as a form of expression aimed at delving into the multifariousness of the self. These include the “Daughter of Art History” series, depicting famous portraits in the history of art, the self-explanatory “Actress” series, and the “Requiem”series, recreating important male figures in politics and war based on seminal news photographs from the twentieth century.

KISHIMOTO Sayako, 21c. Erotical Flying Machines – A Trip to the Galaxy (Original Drawing) (part), 1983
pastel, pen, color pencil on paper
collection: 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art, Kanazawa
© IIDA Yoshiko
photo: SAIKI Taku

KISHIMOTO Sayako

Born in Nagyoya, Aichi, Japan in 1939. Died there in 1988.
Kishimoto Sayako was involved in the movement of “Neo Dadaism Organizers” which was formed in Tokyo in the 1960s, and worked actively presenting performance and painting until she died in 1988. Her diverse works were always based on severe criticism on the social framework consisting of male-driven culture, power-oriented culture and phallic society. In the 1980s in particular, through aggressive activities in giving performances and showing dynamic paintings, she deepened her social criticism further raising questions about the way the individual should be and selfexpression.

KOGANEZAWA Takehito, Graffiti of Velocity, 2008
16 channel video projection
demensions variable
collection: 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art, Kanazawa
©KOGANEZAWA Takehito
installation view of “Between This and That”, 2008 at Kanagawa Prefectural Gallery
photo: SATO Misaki

KOGANEZAWA Takehito

Born in Tokyo, Japan in 1974. Lives and works in Hiroshima.
Koganezawa Takehito participated in the activities of Studio Shokudo while studying imaging arts and sciences at Musashino Art University and presented a video artwork at a group exhibition held in Yokohama in 1997. Soon after graduating he moved to Germany where he continued to live and work until early 2017. His work, which is centered on video but also encompasses performances, drawings and installations, has been shown widely both in Japan and overseas. It has won high acclaim for its keen insights into the subtleties of everyday life and the glimpses it offers of the mystery, unease, beauty, and humor that lie hidden beneath its surface.

Gabriel OROZCO, Ping-Pond Table, 1998
deformed ping-pong tables, ping-pong rackets, ball, water tank, pump filter, water lilies
H76.7×W424.5×D424.5cm
collection: 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art, Kanazawa
© Gabriel OROZCO

Gabriel OROZCO

Born in Veracruz, Mexico in 1962. Lives and works in Mexico City, Mexico and New York, USA.
Gabriel Orozco's works span a range of different media including photography, drawing, sculpture, video, and installation, and usually involve the transformation of existing objects or things or interventions in familiar everyday scenes. By laying geometric patterns over news or sports-news photographs, covering a skull with a checkered pattern, or cutting a car lengthways to create a single-seater vehicle, for example, he seeks to overturn the existing order and find in things meaning or connections that transcend space-time. Drawing on his study of mathematics and profound knowledge of architecture, he seeks to reconstruct from his own unique perspective the order linking all things in the universe.

Bojan ŠARČEVIĆ, Irrigation – Fertilization, 1999
Video (Betacam SP)
8 min. 40 sec.
collection: 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art, Kanazawa
© Bojan Šarčević

Bojan ŠARČEVIĆ

Born in Belgrade, Republic of Serbia (former Yugoslavia) in 1974. Lives and  works in Berlin, Germany and Paris, France.
Bojan Šarčević was living in Sarajevo when the Bosnian War broke out in 1992 and he left his country of birth for Amsterdam and Paris, where he studied art. He produces works that expose by slightly altering familiar objects, relationship, and situations in everyday life the true nature of human beings and hidden cultural and social contradictions, including a piece that presents video footage of the artist writhing on a sheet made of soap and an installation that presents the dirty clothing worn by workers at auto-repair shops who were asked to wear normal clothes to work for two weeks. In recent years Šarčević has focused on abstract forms that call to mind constructivism, combining materials and forms with different properties and exploring the possibilities generated by the new logic that arises from the interplay between them.

USHIJIMA Hitoshi, ball rolls beyond, ball rolls ahead, 2008
steel
φ220cm
collection: 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art, Kanazawa
© USHIJIMA Hitoshi
photo: FUKUNAGA Kazuo

USHIJIMA Hitoshi

Born in Fukuoka, Japan in 1963. Lives and works there.
In the 1980s, Ushijima studied under TANAKA Min's Maijuku dance company. After touring Europe as a performer, he returned to Japan, and while working for the family business, which manufactured playground equipment, he started producing artwork in the form of playground equipment that he referred to as sculpture. A characteristic of many of his works is that they are realized not simply by being viewed, but when the viewer becomes involved in the works through experiencing them. The works often move or metamorphose in response to this human interaction, their function and meaning changing over time. Ushijima has also proposed and implemented a large number of workshop programs on such topics as building radio stations and bases.

Laurie SIMMONS, The Music of Regret, 2005-2006
35mm film (transferred to HD CAM)
44 min. 14 sec.
collection: 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art, Kanazawa
© Laurie SIMMONS

Laurie SIMMONS

Born in Far Rockaway, USA in 1949. Lives and works in New York.
Since the 1970s, Laurie Simmons has produced photographic works in which toys, ventriloquists’ dummies and other objects are placed in dolls houses and against various backgrounds and exquisitely lit to create an imaginary world. She has projected onto artificial stages scenes that cannot be realized in real life. These photographs form series that adopt a narrative style in which after one series concludes, the next series commences. Using such motifs as dolls and houses, Simmons depicts at an everyday level the chaotic state of contemporary society.

"AWAZU Kiyoshi, Makurihirogeru 4" Artist Profile

AWAZU Kiyoshi

Born 1929 in Tokyo, died 2009 in Kawasaki. Self-taught in painting and design. In 1955, Awazu received the Japan Advertising Artists Club Award for his poster Give Our Sea Back. He was a leader in post-war graphic design in Japan and involved in the development as creative expression of reproduction and mass production of images using printing technology. In 1960, he participated in the architectural movement "Metabolism", and in 1977, exhibited his work Graphism, Three Part Work at the Bienal de São Paulo. From the 1980s onward, he conducted a study of hieroglyphics and the written language of Native Americans. He continued to question not only images and the act of communication, but also human existence itself within the entirety of all living things. The foresight and totality of his creative activity still has a major impact today.

Organizers

Organized by:
21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art, Kanazawa (Kanazawa Art Promotion and Development Foundation)